Craps With Cards Vs Craps With Dice

There are laws in place in certain states where an outcome may not be determined through a toss of the dice. This means Craps games, as we know them, are prohibited. However, clever casino operators have installed Craps games using cards instead of dice. Contrary to popular belief, this is a great opportunity because it offers an advantage to the player that is not available in a standard dice game of Craps.

The game of Craps played with cards is played exactly as is Craps with dice. The table layout is the same (with the possible addition of two colored boxes that determine the shoe to be used. You can also bet on those colored boxes.

The casino uses cards numbered ace through six (1 – 6) instead of dice. They also use a shuffle machine known as a “constant shuffle machine” because they don’t bury cards as they are exposed, instead, they are immediately returned to the shuffle machine (that’s why it’s called constant). The same cards used to get a point on the come out roll may not be available to be drawn again until a new shelf is hit, making it disproportionately likely to throw a seven instead, resulting in a win for the wrong bettor. Remember that fact – we’ll use it later.

After the point is established, two more cards are dealt to represent the next roll of the dice. That continues until the point is made or the “shooter” sevens out.

For the purpose of this article, I’m not going into the rules and/or strategies of the game of Craps. I’m assuming you already know them, and the purpose of this article is to point out differences and similarities of the Craps game played with cards as opposed to the dice Craps game.

The short and very sweet difference between the two is this: there is a very distinct and big advantage to playing Craps with cards if you are a “wrong bettor”. You, the player, actually have the advantage over the casino and that is not found in any other game nor in any dice version of Craps.

Conversely there is a bigger advantage for the house if you’re a “right bettor”.

Is there any question as to how you should play the card version of Craps? The answer is obvious – you must be a wrong bettor. Put aside all objections you ever had to betting with the house and against the shooter. You are playing Craps to make money – not friends.

Why are the wrong bettors now in a position of positive odds? In other words, why do we players have an advantage over the casino? That’s unheard of – after all, there are strategies that get the house advantage down towards “0” where the house advantage is small (in dice Craps as well as in other games), but nowhere at any time has the player actually had the advantage over the house – until now.

Here’s the amazing news:

first, as stated above, the cards that established the point cannot be used again during a shooter’s attempts to make the point. This makes a seven even more likely to come up before the point, resulting in a win. That’s important, but that’s not the best part…

In a game of Craps played with dice, laying odds is the way we get the overall odds against winning down to the lowest (best) number possible. That means we can reduce the house advantage to near zero.

However, in a game of Craps played with cards, by knowing when to lay odds against a number and how much to lay against a number, we get the odds down, past zero and into a very healthy advantage for the player. Here are the numbers:

laying odds against a 4 or 10 in a dice Craps game, results in zero advantage to the house (after figuring the don’t pass and or the don’t come – the actual odds give the advantage to the house: 1.364)

but, laying odds against the 4 or 10 in a card Craps game has the house advantage at -0.253. Yep – that is a negative number, and thus the advantage goes to the player – absolutely unheard of! California casinos like the Viejas in San Diego generously offer 10x odds (up to $1,000 winnings), so you should take full advantage of maximum odds against a 4 and 10.

Laying odds against a 5 or 9 in both games remains at zero – no advantage to the house nor to the player. So, lay your “normal” odds against a 5 or 9.

Laying odds against a 6 or 8 in a dice Craps game, results in zero advantage to the house.

But, laying odds against the 6 or 8 in a card Craps game has the house advantage at -0.207. Yep, another advantage for the player! Again, in California, lay maximum odds.

So, if the player laid the maximum odds on points of 4, 6, 8, and 10, then the overall player edge between the don’t pass and laying odds would be +0.022%. That’s amazing!

So, take advantage of this golden opportunity, and gratefully play Craps with cards instead of dice!

Is This The World’s Fairest Casino?

We all know casinos are built to make money from poor saps like you and me, yet no matter what, people keep on gambling. However, this article isn’t on the socio-psychological habits of gamblers, this is a look into what could possibly be the world’s fairest casino.

Just quickly, in case you don’t know why casinos aren’t fair, it’s because of a thing called the ‘house edge’. This is something that gives the casino an advantage over the player, for example the ‘0’ or ’00’ slots on a roulette wheel which mean the player automatically loses and the house wins. All casinos (well not all anymore as we’re about to learn) have a house edge on all their games, giving them the inherent ability to make money.

Then comes along BetFair. BetFair is an online casino that has been operating for a while, though they’ve just launched what they call their ‘Zero Lounge’. This is an area of the casino where most of the house edges have been removed from their games. For example in roulette, the ‘0’ slots in the wheel have been removed, making the game just as fair for the player as it is for the casino.

In the casino and gambling world this is absolutely astonishing. No casino previously has ever considered doing anything like this as it would basically take their guarantee of making cash away from them and put them on an even playing field with the player, though despite this, it’s exactly what BetFair have done.

The only logical reason I can surmise is that they’ve done it is to draw players to the site in the hope that once there, you’ll also spend money elsewhere on their webpage like their sports betting. If this is the case, it’s an absolutely fantastic marketing ploy to get customers to the site. Hell, it got me to go there!

One game which hasn’t technically had the edge taken away is blackjack because you still can’t see the dealer’s second card, however they do give a higher payout if you achieve a two card blackjack.

Anyway, this isn’t a plug for the casino at all, just a tip that if you want to bet somewhere that you can actually say your odds are even with the casino, then this would be the only place on earth I know you can do this.

Gambling Myths Vs Gambling Facts – You Heard All the Myths, Now Here Are the Facts

So what are the gambling myths and gambling facts? A myth is defined as: A popular belief or tradition that has grown up around something or someone. A fact is defined as: A piece of information projected as having objective reality. In the gambling industry there are numerous myths perceived to be facts that range from where the hot slot machines are to tips while playing table games. Here are a few:

Slot Machines

Myth – “The loosest machines are placed at the entrances”.

Fact – All machines are pre-programed to hold a certain percentage of monies played over time to ensure a profit. This is known as the house edge, AKA casino advantage. The percentages may vary from 1 to 15% depending on jurisdiction, denomination, or type.

Myth – “The slots seem to be hitting less on the weekends when it’s crowded. That’s when they tighten them up to make more money”.

Fact – First of all it’s against the law to change the hold amount. Second, the only way to “tighten” up a machine s to contact a representative from the manufacturer to come and change the computer chip, and they would also need casino control board approval. This is time consuming and expensive.

Myth – “Slot attendants know where the hot ones are. Grease their palm and they’ll lead you to the right machines”.

Fact – No one knows which ones are about to hit. Some casinos advertise banks of machines with 98 or 99% paybacks but that’s over the long term. If any slot attendant knew which ones were due to hit, their relatives would probably be playing them.

Myth – “I’ve been playing this machine for a long time and losing. When I left, another player took my seat, and he hits a jackpot on the first spin! If I played just one more spin that jackpot would be mine”!

Fact – A computer chip in the machine called the Random Number Generator, generates thousands of combinations every second. Jackpots can happen even when the machine is not in play. It’s not likely that you would have won.

Blackjack

Myth – “The novice player on my right is making all the wrong moves. He just hit a 16 against a weak dealer 5. He busts by drawing a 10, which should have been mine. I would have won with my double down 11”.

Fact – It’s true that a bad player can affect the outcome of other players hands, but they can also make decisions that result in other players winning. it evens itself out over the long term.

Myth – “I just lost 5 hands in a row. I’m due to win so I’m going to bet up to recoup my losses”.

Fact – The result of your previous hands has no bearing on the results of future hands. If you keep betting up, your money might disappear sooner.

Craps

Myth – “It’s bad luck when a stick man sends the dice to a shooter with a seven showing”.

Fact – Stick persons do not do this intentionally. Sometimes a die will flip on the felt and a seven will show. Sometimes players pre-set the dice to the number they want to hit before tossing. This only holds up the game and aggravates others. Pre-setting the dice does not affect the outcome of the roll.

Myth – “A virgin shooter is good luck”.

Fact – No person or event can cause good or bad luck. First time shooters are often remembered when they win for other players at the table, bu quickly forgotten when they lose.

These are just a few of the gambling myths that have infiltrated the industry over time. Forget the myths and know the facts to maintain a positive and winning attitude. Good Luck!

Perce Galea: The Prince

Among the ranks of big Australian punters, during the times when wagering on horse races often attracted an element of society not noted for exemplary scruples, Percival John Galea, a.k.a. “Perce” and “The Prince,” left his inimitable, indelible mark on the Sport of Kings in Australia.

Born 26 October 1910 in Malta, one of 10 children, his family immigrated to Australia around 1912, settling near Sydney. Perce began his punting career as early as 1924. Working as a newsboy outside Central Railway Station, he used his earnings to place small wagers.

By 1926, he was employed as a milk man, and had his first taste of the good fortune that was to follow him for the rest of his life.

This good fortune took the form of one of Galea’s customers by the name of Rodney Bangor who happened to be the owner of none other than Peter Pan. Perce took Bangor’s tip to back Peter Pan in the 1934 Melbourne cup, for which he earned a $150 payday, a considerable sum in those times.

For the next several years leading up to World War II, he was employed as a wharf labourer. The outbreak of World War II up to around 1948 saw him occupying the role of a registered bookmaker for the Wentworth Park greyhound races, along with running baccarat “schools” with Samuel Lee and a man with criminal connections, Sid Kelly.

Galea placed a $2,500 investment in Lee’s company in 1949 and given the title of director, worked as a host and manager in Lee’s restaurant. It was during this time, 1952, that he had a brush with the law over the purchase of black-market beer. He went on to become co-owner and manager of a nightclub in Elizabeth Bay called the Roslyn Social Club. The club was raided by the police in 1953 and produced 46 arrests. Galea was fined a small amount for running an illegal gambling house, from which he learned a lesson of the benefit supplied from the right amount of money placed in the proper hands. The authorities never bothered him again with the exception of a run in with the taxation commissioner over his understatement of his income between 1955 to 1963.

Galea was experiencing some financial difficulties when Lady Luck smiled on him again and bestowed $12,000 in the form of lottery winnings. This is when his punting career took off.

He took enough prize money to buy his first race horse in 1961. He regularly plunged large sums in what could have been considered as a sign of a compulsive gambler, but he adhered to the old adage that you don’t have a gambling problem if you’re winning. Even after suffering a heart attack in 1962, he continued to wager big, plunging as much as $25,000 on a single race.

1964 produced his best year as a horse owner. His horse, Eskimo Prince, won the STC Golden Slipper Stakes, bringing Galea something in the neighborhood of $33,000. He very nearly touched off a riot, when receiving an enthusiastic welcome afterward, he began tossing bank notes to the crowd.

Eskimo Prince also took the Rosehill Guineas and the AJC Sires’ Produce Stakes, bringing Galea great sums to add to his tote, however, he reputedly gave $40,000 back when Eskimo Prince failed to place in the AJC Derby.

The third stroke of luck to grace Galea bore an eerie resemblance to that experienced in 1960 by Melbourne Mick Bartley. Perce, in 1975, cached $200,000 from the Sydney Opera House lottery.

Perhaps to make up for the undesirable elements in his life, Galea made generous donations to the Catholic church in Sydney as well as staging an annual party for the less fortunate.

Galea was elected a provisional member of the Australian Jockey club in 1976, which somewhat smacks of irony given Galea’s past associations.

Percival John Galea suffered another heart attack in 1977, died, and was buried in Botany cemetery.

He left behind an estate worth over $400,000, along with a reputation of being a good friend, admired by his fellow punters and feared by bookmakers.